Dalbeattie 10K Half Marathon 2016

Dalbeattie 10K Half Marathon 2016

Frank's Valentine Run 2017

Frank's Valentine Run 2017

Dentdale 2017

Dentdale 2017

Criffel Hill Race 2017

Criffel Hill Race 2017

Devil Takes the Hindmost 2017

Devil Takes the Hindmost 2017

Club Kit Available

A range of Club Kit is available. Click here for details...

News items and Articles

To submit news items and articles for inclusion on the website, please email the News Team at news@dumfriesrunningclub.org.uk

DRC Grand Prix Competition

The latest standings in the Club Grand Prix competition can be found here:

  Grand Prix Tables
London Marathon 2016

London Marathon 2016

Highland Fling Relay 2016

Highland Fling Relay 2016

Moffat 15k 2016

Moffat 15k 2016

Screel Hill Race 2017

Screel Hill Race 2017

Santa Run 2017

Santa Run 2017



Carrauntoohil Hill Race

30/05/2015

On Saturday 30th May, the Irish Mountain Running Association held the Carrauntoohil race. Mo Khan made the journey over to Kerry to meet up with his Irish hill running comrades and tackle the highest peak in Ireland. Mo reports as follows…

"The Macgillycuddy’s Reek mountain range in County Kerry is a stunning setting for a hill race. It contains the only hills in Ireland which have summits above 1000m and has a landscape similar to the Lake District. The race starts on the Kerry Way in the Bridia Valley, and is an out and back route which takes in the neighbouring peak of Caher. The race distance is 7.6 miles with a total climb of approximately 3500ft. The field was reasonably small despite being an Irish Championship race with only 2 Scottish clubs being represented (DRC and HBT).

The forecast was poor and I was expecting bad weather up top. The race organiser gave a very succinct race briefing: ‘Get to the top, run around the cross, and then head back down’.. and before we knew it, we were off.

There was a gradual climb to begin with over runnable grassy paths with a few fences which needed to be jumped. Around 1500ft, the underfoot terrain varied between ankle deep bog and rocks. By 2000ft, the visibility had reduced to just several metres, and we had 50mph gusts for company. At this stage, the key was to not lose sight of the runner in front (and hope they knew where they were going!) especially as it was an unmarked route. Arriving at Caher, we had to be extra cautious as the route became a technical ridge run with a precipitous drop to the north. In some ways, it was probably a good thing for me that the poor visibility meant I couldn’t see the drop. The final push to the iron cross which marks the summit of Carrauntoohil was on marginally more forgiving terrain. By the time I started my return leg, the rain had well and truly settled in. The key to the descent was not to go north when coming off Caher. Several runners made this mistake, ending up in a valley on the wrong side of the mountain. Thankfully, all competitors returned safely even if cold and sodden.

Based on my times for Nevis, I had targeted a time of 2h 30 - 2h 45. So I was well pleased to finish in 2h 26 despite the miserable conditions. I don’t mind admitting that the Guinness (which always tastes better in Ireland) went down well that Sat evening!"

Mo.

Back

News Archive